Small Business Ideas For Kids – Beyond The Lemonade Stand

Small Business Ideas For Kids – Beyond The Lemonade Stand

Shoveling Snow (small business ideas)

Kids may definitely assist with the need to shovel snow and clear roads and sidewalks, however this one will obviously depend on your location and seasonality.(small business ideas)

This is just one of several manual labor companies that are perfect for youngsters to work in while earning money.

Handling Newspaper Deliveries (small business ideas)

From the age of 8 to 16, Jeff Neal delivered papers. He forwarded me this tale:

Every day after school, I only had to work for about 30 minutes. Although it wasn’t much, it did teach me responsibility and discipline.

At the end of each month, I had to go door to door to collect the money. This wasn’t a significant issue.

The Thanksgiving newspaper was the most inconvenient since it was the size of a dictionary, with all those retail inserts touting Christmas sales.

However, I clearly recall this particular incident from fourth grade. There was now a book market where you could purchase interesting books.

The other grades and all of my classmates went crazy about it.

I was also thrilled because I was ten years old. In order to spend like a baller, I took out this large wad of $1 and $5 bills, which probably totaled around $30. I also recall the other children gaping at the cash with whispered comments about how much money it was.

I realized I was a hustler at that point.

Scattering and collecting leaves (small business ideas)

Bagging leaves in the fall is a fantastic business for youngsters, according to Jim Wang of WalletHacks. “You might go door to door in your neighborhood and offer to bag leaves for $1-2 each bag.”

Kids will learn how to haggle their rates as they go since they might initially charge too much or too little, but they’ll eventually figure it out, he continued. Additionally, it doesn’t need a lot of initial money. All you need is a rake and some bags!

Cleaning Trash Cans (small business ideas)

The 15- and 9-year-old children of Dustin Riechmann ended up earning about $850 in total, or about $25 per hour, by cleaning up trash and recycling containers in their neighborhood.

The company got its start with a few well-placed fliers and a post in the neighborhood Facebook group. With low initial expenditures, the pair set prices of $15 for one can and $25 for two, and they managed to attract a small number of clients.

Market shells

According to Matt Burgess of British Columbia, his 4-year-old daughter gathered and decorated seashells before selling them for $1 each at a nearby market.

Watching pets

When 12-year-old Tony Guertin opened Tony’s Pet Sitting, he anticipated some clients might be wary of entrusting their dearest friend to a young child. What then did he do?

To provide clients piece of mind, he went out and purchased insurance. The insurance company later decided it was fantastic and created a film about it.

Selling on eBay

Michael from WorkAtHomeInspiration.com informed me that his 12-year-old son Noah has been selling on Ebay for a number of years.

“His favorite team’s (Alabama) license plates are the main item he has sold. We discovered a distributor and purchase 25–50 plates at once. Per license plate, he makes roughly $5 in profit.

Michael, who has an internet store, urges Noah to do the same because entrepreneurship runs in the family.

The purpose of this workshop is to assist the upcoming generation of flippers. My friends Rob and Melissa have been teaching their children the wonderful art of buying low and selling high.

Child care

This was one of my go-to methods of earning money as a young, “responsible” person. Thankfully, there were no emergencies that forced me to drive far, and I had a few regular clients.

Today, sitters as young as 14 can join Care.com, much like word-of-mouth and neighborhood fliers did back then to find jobs. To give parents (and yourself) peace of mind, enroll in CPR and emergency preparedness classes.

Tutoring

The Kumon program greatly benefited the daughter of Doug Nordman (math & reading tutoring). At age 7, she enrolled in their math curriculum and immediately took to it.

She applied for her state work permit as soon as she turned 14 and began working part-time at the same franchise to learn about tutoring and what it takes to run a business, according to Doug.

Kids can tutor for pay, of course, especially if they are knowledgeable in the subject and can locate some younger clients who require a little extra assistance.

Cleaning Up Dog Poop

Kyle Graham, 13, started Call of Doodie Pet Waste Removal in Jacksonville, Florida. Kyle sees it as his “sworn mission to assist you win the war against your backyard doodie,” according to his website.

He claims to earn roughly $250 each week from his poop-scooping company, which he has been in for the past two years. One incredibly clever thing he’s done is to put clients on recurring payment plans; for $40 per month, he’ll come clean your yard once a week.

The number of dogs and the frequency of visits will, of course, affect the cost.

Producing Content

According to Lee Hills, “We aim to encourage our two teenage children to spend as much time producing their own goods rather than consuming others’.” In actuality, that entails setting “device time” restrictions.

So what are they working on creatively these days? “My youngest daughter does YouTube videos, and my oldest daughter has her own Instagram account where she posts her daily drawings.”

They currently have no financial reward for their labors, he continued, but he is “trying to inspire people to be creative and make for their own satisfaction.”

The Show About Science is a podcast that is hosted by Nate, a 6-year-old with a passion for science. Thank you to Robin Chedgey, whose children sell trading cards and jam in their own time, for the tip on that one.

Car washing

Amber Hinds is the owner of the digital marketing firm Road Warrior Creative and teaches entrepreneurship as a volunteer at a neighborhood Montessori school. Students in the first through fifth grades are a part of the school’s entrepreneurial club.

Through Entrepreneur Club, the youngsters successfully launched and ran two businesses last year: a car wash and a business selling greeting cards and crafts.

Source: small business ideas , small business in Singapore

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